What In The Hell Is That?

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What In The Hell Is That? — 32 Comments

  1. Meter for checking 3 volt batteries – approx 1920’s- 1940’s

  2. meter for checking 6 volt batteries. You test from cell to post. 1930′-1950’s.

  3. Tester for individual cells in vehicle batteries. The wavy piece between the 2 points is for resistance to check the cell under load.

  4. I am quite familiar with this particular instrument. It is a Muti-prong Escolong Discriminator. These were quite common in the early 20’s. Using this instrument one can determine the HYdrocalifice resistance of a Dremelote valve(s). Once the value was determined, the meter, you would think, reads in volts. Wrong. It reads in Volorkians, an old Greek word meaning “to lork” or to Lorkeesus”. For example, 4 “lork” units equal 2.275 foot pounds of Kramelgas. (Hazardous)
    These were found mostly in the tool boxes of Diotrious Engineers.

  5. I agree with what Jerry said on April 24th, but I think it would work just as well on a Kanuter Valve. I have used in that way myself.

  6. Battery tester is it but I have never seen one for only 3 volts.
    The farm tractors use a 6 volt system so I don’t know what it is used on.

  7. Everybody is wrong, it is and electric eel gig.
    It has a short handle because electric eels are usually in shallow water and when you gig them and hoist them on board you need to make sure they are fully discharged before grabbing them with you bare hands to cut out their electrolysis defibrillators.

  8. How can so many electricians be so wrong?
    This do-dad is an old moisture meter from a lumber mill. After the lumber was stacked for drying (laid out with 2X4’s placed between each layer of boards so the wind would blow through the stacks) they would stick this thing into the ends and it would tell them the amount of moisture still in the lumber. Otherwise, Aaron had the best story.

  9. Oh puleeeeze…..this is how we REALLY used to keep those darned teenagers in line…. :)

  10. This is my first time here, as I just found this web site today.
    I think Jerry, and Mark were very close. It is an automotive tool, but it’s used to check, or set diesel spark plug gaps, and when inverted can be used to check the static discharge of muffler bearings. In today’s big rigs the discharge meter is mounted right in the dash, so the driver can tell if he needs to pull over while pulling a long, steep grade to let the muffler cool down. There was talk of installing one on each spark plug, but it would be too costly.

  11. THIS IS THE FIRST TIME I HAVE SEEN ONE OF THESE TESTERS SINCE I WORKED FOR PACIFIC TELEPHONE IN IN THE 1950″S. WE USED THEM TO TEST EDISON CELLS WHICH ARE USED FOR BACK UP POWER WHENEVER THE EXTERNAL POWER GOES OFF LINE. THE CELLS ARE ALSO USED FOR RINGING MACHINE POWER. NICE TO SEE ONE OF THESE AGAIN. BRINGS BACK MEMORIES!!!

  12. This devise measures the static electricity generated while one is hand cultivating in the garden!

  13. Lead-Acid cell (as in battery of cells) load tester. Single cell at a time for 2.2 volts optimum. Gauge indicates both polarity and charge. Wavy thing is a Nickle-Chrome resistance strap that gets very hot while testing. CAL-OSHA loved seeing these things and writing fines for unsafe devices…. as hydrogen gas was given off by cell under load right up to the hot Ni-Chrome band.
    (Sacramento Battery has one on display.)

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